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Join us to celebrate Lunar New Year from 1 - 15 February.

 

Join us at 4pm, February 12 for a Lion Dance and Kung Fu performance. Enjoy the lanterns, local artwork, grab a craft brew at Monka, and a bite from a food truck, whilst listening to local musicians at Monka.

 

Shoreline and Lake Forest Park are vibrant cities, rich in cultural diversity. This event aims to bring people together in honor and recognition of our North King County Asian communities. Stop by and celebrate traditional and contemporary Asian culture, food, art, and music.

Free to attend (all ages) donations greatly appreciated so we can continue to provide cultural events in our community.

WHEN?

 

Lanterns on display:

1 - 15 February

Lion Dance & Performances:

starts 4pm, 12 February

 

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WHERE?

Monka Brewing &

Uplift Climbing

17211 15th Ave NE, Shoreline, WA 98155

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Festival Highlights

Food & Beverage

Grab a bite from a local Asian Food Truck and enjoy a craft brew at Monka

Music and Dance

Join us - 4pm February 12 for a Lion Dance and Kung Fu performance, followed by some local musicians playing at Monka Brewing.

Lanterns

Enjoy hundreds of handmade lanterns on display February 1 - 15.

Craft

Make your own paper lantern with this At-Home Lantern Kit created by Hua Mandarin Studio.

Year of the Tiger

Celebrate Chinese New Year and welcome in the Year of the Tiger

Interested in participating?

Please see the Applications page

THANK YOU to our Sponsors & Partners

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Image by Hodaka Kato

Lantern Festival Facts

The Lantern Festival has been part of the Chinese New Year celebrations since the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 221AD).  

 

It is said that the holiday evolved from an ancient Chinese belief that celestial spirits could be seen flying about in the light of the first full moon of the lunar calendar. 

 

People used torches and eventually lanterns of every shape, size and color to aid them in spotting the spirits. 

 

The lanterns come in all shapes and sizes. Some are created in the form of animals, insects, flowers, people or even machines and buildings. Others depict scenes from popular stories teaching filial piety and traditional values. A favorite subject is the zodiac animal of the year. 

Find out more info here.